Relationships in Young and Middle Adulthood

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Chapter 10 Becoming an Adult

1. How could Schaie’s distinction between adolescence and adulthood influence adult education?

2. Identify several major events in your past. How did these events affirm or change your life story? (Share only things you are comfortable sharing with the class)

3. If you do not have postformal thought, can you understand the concept of postformal thought?

Chapter 11 Being with Others: Relationships in Young and Middle Adulthood

1. What are some suggestions for reducing violence in intimate relationships?

2. Compare the psychological effects of divorce on the divorced couple to those experienced by the children of divorce.

3. Describe the obstacles that may interfere with foster, adoptive, or stepchildren forming bonds with their new parents.

Classmate 1

Chapter 10

Schaie’s distinction between adulthood and adolescence features remarkable differences in cognitive abilities. Essentially, it implies adults have a better capacity to understand and contextualize complex concepts. Therefore, the distinction influences adult education by increasing the urge to learn and contextualize issues affecting them and the rest of society. As a result, Schaie’s distinction promotes awareness, collaboration, and societal progress due to the successful integration of education to all units defined by age. Some of my most significant events include my graduation from college, first job, and first date with an intimate partner. The events affirmed my life story by becoming anything I wanted and treating people better; living an honest life is possible; it only takes self-belief. I believe understanding the concept of postformal thought and practicing it are mutually exclusive concepts. Therefore, I think someone can understand the concept without necessarily need to be a postformal thinker.

Chapter 11

Reducing intimate partner violence requires understanding and acknowledging social-ecological changes across individual, societal, and community levels. Specifically, it includes adopting healthy and respectful conversations, practicing personal space respect, encouraging close family connection and openness. While divorce has adverse psychological effects on both the couple and children, the latter feels more intense outcomes. First of all, children’s growth regresses due to stress, changing sleeping patterns, and losing interest in certain activities. Couples may sink into depression, have anger management issues, make poor intimate decisions due to perceived betrayal. Nonetheless, in both instances, anxiety, social withdrawal, and anger become constant. Obstacles to a foster child’s bonding with new parents may include absence, abuse, alcoholism, individual struggles, financial resources to offer necessary resources. When parents are primarily absent due to work commitments, it distances them from the foster children, creating undesired feelings. Finally, alcoholism equally alienates parents and further creates a dysfunctional family through behavioral changes.

Classmate 2

Chapter 10

Becoming an Adult

1. How could Schaie’s distinction between adolescence and adulthood influence adult education?

According to “The Seattle Longitudinal Study” the distinction between adolescence and adulthood education was inconclusive. Inconclusive in the sense that there were no overall trends. Some people started a decline in their 40’s and 50’s others showed no decline. The study did have 3 overall take a way to understand. The first is that intellectual development in adulthood is indicated by steady leveling off gains between young adulthood and middle age then a period of stable learning and in the end a decline. The second and third observation is that these results varied from person to person. I believe it would have been important to study people from all over the world and in the different economic and demographic backgrounds to truly see a trend that would point out more predominant patterns.

2. Identify several major events in your past. How did these events affirm or change your life story? (Share only things you are comfortable sharing with the class)

This one is easy for me. Becoming a mother was the biggest change in my life and I went from being a selfish young adult to thinking about the future of my daughter. I instantly thought about things I had never thought about in the past. I cared about the environment and global warming, what’s the world going to be like for my daughter when she’s a young adult? How will I pay for her college? How can I be the best example of a woman to her? I walked the stage 6 months pregnant with her because I decided to go back to school and finish my degree for her. Then going through a divorce, I reevaluated my life and went back to school for my bachelor’s degree. I’ve been blessed with the ability to learn from my mistakes and turn lemons into lemonade, as hard as it was at times. These major life events forced me to make changes for the life I want. Also, my faith and belief in God has grown tremendously with every battle I get through. It’s like he shows me over and over that his plans are better than the plan I have for myself. I stay obedient and he lights the way.

3. If you do not have postformal thought, can you understand the concept of postformal thought?

This is a tricky question; I feel it can go either way. When it deals with children, they do not have the sense of understanding things that are outside of their own believe and how they view a situation. There are also many grown adults that lack the ability to see outside the box. For example, the vaccine, there are many people that believe the vaccine is the ONLY way to flatten the curve, no other solution. The same for the unvaccinated people that feel the vaccine will not help them and will cause damage to their bodies. My point, there are many stubborn people that see things one way and will not budge whatsoever. Then there are people with postformal thoughts that will listen to both sides and understand both ways of doing things. To answer the question, I guess I’ll lean more towards no because if you did have the concept of postformal thought you would take into consideration both sides and multiple points of view.

Chapter 11

Being with Others: Relationships in Young and Middle Adulthood

1. What are some suggestions for reducing violence in intimate relationships?

As cliché as this might sound but I feel counseling is the best suggestion. I believe this because many people are walking around hurt, and emotionally immature and don’t understand the baggage they carry every day. Childhood trauma and how a person grew up, has everything to do with how a person carries themselves in life. If you don’t understand what childhood “injuries” you walk with, a person will continue to bleed onto people that didn’t hurt them. Need for control, one of the causes for violence in a relationship indicates to me, that you lacked control as a child or had too much control and now live your life like that. Understanding the emotion behind the behavior is KEY in changing the behavior.

2. Compare the psychological effects of divorce on the divorced couple to those experienced by the children of divorce.

Divorce affects the parents financially and emotionally. The parents often look at themselves as failures, deeply disappointed and rejected. In the case of a child, they carry the view of marriage differently. It affects the relationship with one of the parents also has an effect on their view of intimacy and love.

3. Describe the obstacles that may interfere with foster, adoptive, or stepchildren forming bonds with their new parents.

Children under the age of 1 will bond well with foster or stepparents. Children that are older will have already developed a bond with their biological parents. In these cases it’s harder to have a child open up and bond with the stepparent or adoptive.

Last Updated on September 29, 2021