Psychology Take Home Exam 2

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Take Home Exam 2

Also read: Stress and Health Mental Health

  1. Why is it important to understand how social ecological factors (poverty, racism, etc.) impact the likelihood of experiencing trauma?
  2. Describe how interactions in the microsystem can be impacted by mesosystem social-ecological factors?
  3. Describe how interactions in the microsystem are impacted by exosystem social-ecological factors?
  4. Describe how interactions in the microsystem are impacted by macrosystem social-ecological factors?
  5. Describe how interactions in the microsystem are impacted by chronosystem social-ecological factors?
  6. Describe how interactions in the mesosystem are impacted by microsystem social-ecological factors?
  7. Describe how interactions in the mesosystem are impacted by exosystem social-ecological factors?
  8. Describe how policies/rules/laws in the exosystem are impacted by macrosystem social-ecological factors?
  9. Describe how are the beliefs and values in the macrosystem are impacted by chronosystem social-ecological factors?
  10. What area of the “Interacting Layers of Trauma & Healing” will your work encompass? What types of “Dehumanization & Distress” will those you serve likely experience? How will you heal the trauma of those you will serve in your role?

ACEs & Historical Trauma

Ingrid l. Cockhren, m.ed

The ACEs Study

Adverse Childhood Experiences

According to the CDC, Adverse Childhood Experiences, or ACEs, are experiences that occur during childhood and account for a wide range of health and social consequences.

ACEs have been categorized into 10 types with each type reflecting either child abuse, child neglect or household challenges that negatively impact brain development, social-emotional growth and overall health and wellbeing.

More resources: Application of The Cognitive Psychology in Mental Illness or Trauma

Adverse Childhood Experiences

REDESIGN

4

KEEP

5

Reflection

What is your ACE score?

Dr. Robert Anda ACEs Pyramid

Ryse center extended aces pyramid

REDESIGN

www.communityresiliencecookbook.org

8

Key Terms & concepts

Racial Trauma:

Refers to the mental and emotional injury caused by encounters with racial bias and ethnic discrimination, racism, and hate crimes. In the U.S., Black, Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC) are most vulnerable due to living under a system of white supremacy. Also referred to as rase-based traumatic stress.

Experiences of race-based discrimination can have detrimental psychological impacts on individuals and their wider communities. In some individuals, prolonged incidents of racism can lead to symptoms like those experienced with post-traumatic stress disorder. This can look like depression, anger, recurring thoughts of the event, physical reactions (e.g. headaches, chest pains, insomnia), hypervigilance, low-self-esteem, and mentally distancing from the traumatic events.

Race-based traumatic stress is a mental injury that can occur as the result of living within a racist system or experiencing events of racism.

Definitions & Key Terms

Mental Health America

www.mhanational.org

Collective trauma

Collective trauma is a cataclysmic event that shatters the basic fabric of society. Aside from the horrific loss of life, collective trauma is also a crisis of meaning.

Collective trauma transforms into a collective memory and culminates in a system of meaning that allows groups to redefine who they are and where they are going.

For victims, the memory of trauma may be adaptive for group survival, but also elevates existential threat, which prompts a search for meaning, and the construction of a trans-generational collective self.

-Gilad Hirschberger

Historical Trauma

The term was first coined in the 1980’s by Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Braveheart, a Native American social worker.

Dr. Braveheart defined Historical Trauma as “a cumulative emotional and psychological wounding over the lifespan and across generations, emanating from massive group trauma.”

Dr. Braveheart also stated that historical Trauma was also accompanied by Historical Unresolved Grief.

Intergenerational Transmission

As defined by the International Encyclopedia of Marriage & Family, Intergenerational transmission refers to “movement, passage, or exchange” of beliefs, norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors specific to that family, or that reflect sociocultural, religious, and ethnically relevant practices and beliefs.

Dr. Robert Anda ACEs Pyramid

ACEs & Historical Trauma

Ingrid l. Cockhren, m.ed

Dr. Robert Anda ACEs Pyramid

Ryse center extended aces pyramid

REDESIGN

www.communityresiliencecookbook.org

3

Social Ecological model of development -Uri Brofenbrenner

The innermost system, MICROSYSTEM, includes the home, school, work.

Childhood Trauma

Bullying

Parents’ Beliefs

Parents’ Trauma

Parents’ Parenting Style

Spheres of Influence

5

The next closest system, MESOSYSTEM, refers to the interactions between the different settings within the microsystem.

Extended Family

Neighborhoods

Socio-economic Status

Local Issues

Familial Trauma

Spheres of Influence

6

The next closest system, EXOSYSTEM, refers to factors that affect the individual indirectly, parent’s workplace, friends and friends’ parents, politics, and government.

Political Influences

Places of Worship

State Issues

Regional Influences

Mass Media

Social Media

Spheres of Influence

7

The next system, MACROSYSTEM, refers to beliefs, values, society and cultural influences.

Institutional Racism

Patriarchal System

Religion

Law

Spheres of Influence

8

The outermost system, CHRONOSYSTEM, refers to historical context, generational context and time.

Historical Trauma

Genocide

Slavery

Internment Camps

Women as Property

Generational Issues

World Wars

Immigration

Spheres of Influence

9

Last Updated on October 4, 2020 by Essay Pro