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Participatory Approach to Public Health Research

PBHL 20006 Individual Assessment 1

Due: Thursday Week 5, 5:00 pm

Weighting: 30%

From Week 2 to Week 5, you will be learning about the foundations of participatory research. Prior to attending each week’s tutorial class, you will need to find and analyze one article (can be peer-reviewed e.g. journal article or non-peer-reviewed e.g. news article) related to this week’s topic. The following are examples of where you can access your weekly articles:

  • Public Health in your news feed
  • Croakey https://www.croakey.org/
  • The Prevention Centre https://preventioncentre.org.au/news/
  • The Conversation https://theconversation.com/au/topics/public-health-136
  • The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/health
  • CQU Library https://www.cqu.edu.au/student-life/library

For this assessment, you will need to submit five short critiques (300 words each).

  • Four critiques will be related directly to the articles you find (i.e. one article for each week starting in Week 2). In addition to explaining your chosen article in relation to the week’s topic, you will compare your article to one of your classmate’s articles as far as meaning.
  • The final critique summarises what the four critiques mean for you as a participatory health researcher.

You need to analyze a reference PRIOR to attending the tutorial class. Your critique is based on the tutorial class discussions. If you do not view the lecture and secure an article prior to attending the tutorial class, you will not be able to participate fully in discussions which may impede your ability to undertake the critique. Please post your Harvard reference for the article, haiku, and your name here:

Week 2: https://wakelet.com/i/invite?code=8eczezva

Week 3 https://wakelet.com/i/invite?code=p6z6c0rp

Week 4: https://wakelet.com/i/invite?code=8e5pjuzj

Week 5: https://wakelet.com/i/invite?code=k85iofzv

Examples of Harvard Referencing

Surname, 2020, ‘Title of the publication’, Title of Journal, vol. 00, no. 0, pp. 1-10.

Cattell, V, Dines, N, Gesler, W & Curtis, S 2008, ‘Mingling, observing, and lingering: Everyday public spaces and their implications for well-being and social relations ’,  Health & Place, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 544-561.

 

Bowles, N, 2020. ‘In a lockdown, a neighborhood opens up ’,  The New York Times. 30 May. Available at:  https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/30/technology/bernal-heights.html (Accessed 5 June 2020).

Haiku

A Haiku is a Japanese form of short poetry. It typically has three sentences with a total of 17 syllables. Syllables are the sound of words. For example, “Syllable” has three syllables. “Hello” has two syllables. “Play” has one syllable. A haiku will help you distill the importance of your readings, narrowing concepts into a digestible sentence. Try your name, how many syllables does your name have? If you are still unsure https://syllablecounter.net/

Warm-up

Write 6 adjectives related to the topic

Write 6 nouns related to the topic

Write 6 verbs related to the topic

Write 6 concepts related to the topic

Write a haiku poem related to public health.

TITLE
Line 1 (5 syllables)
Line 2 (7 syllables)
Line 3 (5 syllables)

Example

PANDEMIC

Very infectious

Physical distance, wash hands

Still unknown the cure

FORMAT FOR EACH WEEK (WEEKS 2,3,4,5)

Harvard reference article

Haiku

Critique

You need to write a short critique of each of your tutorial class discussions. A critique is a detailed analysis of something. This means you cannot simply describe the discussion. You need to think about the discussion and write a concise, coherent interrogation of the discussion. For example, these are some questions you should answer.

  • How does your haiku reflect this week’s topic?
  • How does your haiku compare to someone else’s haiku as far as meaning?
  • What do the discussed articles mean for the future of public health research?

Now write your critique. It should be approximately 300 words (excluding references).

FIFTH CRITIQUE

Review your four critiques and the various articles you have read. What have you learned in relation to participatory health research?

  • Justify taking a participatory health approach to public health research
  • Discuss the challenges associated with taking a participatory approach to public health research

Write your reflection. It should be approximately 300 words (excluding references).

Write a haiku poem about your reflection.

TITLE
Line 1 (5 syllables)
Line 2 (7 syllables)
Line 3 (5 syllables)

 

CriteriaCritique Week 2,3,4,5
MarkHD (5.0-4.3)D (4.2-3.8)C (3.7-3.3)P (3.2-2.5)F (2.4-0)
Critique of contentMethodically discriminates information substantiated by robust evidence. Identifies and rectifies logical flaws. Viewpoints of experts are questioned analytically. Critically synthesizes and evaluates information and identifies gaps in knowledge to develop a comprehensive critical analysis: distinct originality of thought.Discriminates information substantiated by robust evidence. Identifies and rectifies logical flaws. Information is taken from source(s) with excellent interpretation to develop a comprehensive critical analysis. Viewpoints of experts are questioned analytically.Uses information substantiated by robust evidence. Identifies logical flaws.

Information is taken from source(s) with appropriate interpretation to develop a comprehensive critical analysis.

Uses information substantiated by evidence. Information is taken from source(s) with appropriate interpretation to develop a critical analysis.Often confuses personal opinion with information substantiated by evidence. Information is taken from source with some interpretation but not enough to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis
CriteriaSummary Critique
MarkHD (10.0-8.5)D (8.4-7.5)C (7.4-6.5)P (6.4-5.0)F (4.9-0)
Justification of Participatory Health Research (PHR)Reflexively analyses learning to consistently, clearly, succinctly, and expertly justify PHR. Organizes and synthesizes evidence to reveal insightful patterns about the challenges associated with a participatory approach.Reflectively analyses learning to consistently, clearly, and expertly justify PHR. Organizes and synthesizes evidence to reveal patterns of the challenges associated with a participatory approach.Analyses learning to clearly and expertly justify PHR. Organizes and synthesizes complex evidence to reveal obvious patterns about the challenges associated with a participatory approach.Clearly justifies PHR and/or its challenges. Organises and synthesises some evidence to reveal some subtle patterns, differences or similarities.Rarely or does not clearly describe PHR without ambiguities. Unable or rarely able to organise and evidence.

EXAMPLE SUBMISSION

WEEK 2

Freed, J.S., Kwon, S.Y., El, H.J., Gottlieb, M. and Roth, R., 2020. Which Country is Truly Developed? COVID-19 has Answered the Question. Annals of global health, 86(1).

The infrastructure

Prevents and causes outbreaks

How soon will we learn?

Szreter (1999) highlights that deprivation, disease, and death only occur after disruption when there is an inadequate response. COVID-19, as a disruption, has shown where the most crucial shortcomings of the current public health system lie (Zhang et al. 2020). And this occurrence has come about before as Freed (2020) mentions, during the European Refugee Crisis. It highlighted that the so-called ‘developed’ countries lacked the infrastructure or preparedness to deal with a pandemic.

I think this idea relates to Irene’s haiku when she mentions “lessons from the past.” She talked about a chain of events that happened in regard to the public health act of 1848. Chadwick warned of a cholera outbreak because of water/sewage impurities (Hassan 1985). As the Public Health Act of 1848 came too late to stop the outbreak of Cholera in 19th century Britain, so has the response to the COVID 19 pandemic on a national and international global public health scale. Cholera, the refugee crisis, and now COVID-19 can serve as lessons from the past to ideally inform future planning, policy, and action.

It seems historical and now presently, queries into the strength of our public health infrastructures are made only after a disruption (i.e. pandemic, outbreak, etc.) when in reality, measures should be taken routinely to assess weaknesses with or without a global pandemic in the backdrop. This requires a perspective shift, from “what are we trying to solve?” to “what is trying to prevent?” While both questions are relevant and necessary in assessing public health, I think the real issue, stemming historically and presently, is how do we compensate for both?

References

Freed, J.S., Kwon, S.Y., El, H.J., Gottlieb, M. & Roth, R., 2020. Which country is truly developed? COVID-19 has answered the question. Annals of Global Health, 86(1), 51.

Hassan, J.A., 1985. The growth and impact of the British water industry in the 19th century. Economic History Review 38, pp. 531-547.

Zhang S., Wang Y., Rauch A., & Wei F., 2020. Unprecedented disruption of lives and work: Health, distress, and life satisfaction of working adults in China one month into the COVID-19 outbreak. Psychiatry Research 288, 112958.

PBHL 20006 Individual Assessment 1, Critiques

Due: Week 5

Weighting: 30%

You will write a 300-word critique for each week with a final critique of your learning. These critiques will be submitted in a ONE-word document.

FORMAT FOR EACH WEEK (WEEKS 2,3,4,5)

Harvard reference to the article

Haiku or summary statement

Critique

You need to write a short critique of each of your tutorial class discussions/relevance of your article to the week’s learning content. A critique is a detailed analysis of something. This means you cannot simply describe or summarise your article. You need to think about the main concepts discussed through lectures, readings, and tutorials and then see how your chosen article applies these concepts. Your critique should answer these 3 questions:

  • How does your haiku/article reflect this week’s topic?
  • How does your haiku/article compare to someone else’s haiku/article as far as meaning?
  • What do the discussed articles mean for the future of public health research?

Now write your critique. It should be approximately 300 words (excluding references).

FIRST CRITIQUE Traditional Research

SECOND CRITIQUE Participatory Research

THIRD CRITIQUE Anti-oppressive approaches

FOURTH CRITIQUE Indigenous Research

FIFTH CRITIQUE

Review your four critiques and the various articles you have read. What have you learned in relation to participatory health research?

  • Justify taking a participatory health approach to public health research
  • Discuss the challenges associated with taking a participatory approach to public health research

AN EXAMPLE OF A CRITIQUE FOR WEEK 2 CAN BE FOUND ON THE NEXT PAGE

WEEK 2

Pfeffer, M 2020, Before epidemiologists began modeling disease, it was the job of astrologers, viewed 26 July 2020, https://theconversation.com/before-epidemiologists-began-modelling-disease-it-was-the-job-of-astrologers-137895

The Bubonic Plague

Planetary positions

Plagues arrive and end

My haiku this week examines how communities and populations addressed pandemics up until the late 17th century. While astrology has not been a primary source of modeling disease for 300+ years. Pfeffer (2020) states astrologers were integral in the development of medicine and public health, during the Bubonic Plague. Astrologers sought to find an ontological correlation between the intense periods of fatalities within the plagues and certain planetary positions, offering the first stepping stone for naturalist explanations of disease (Axiology). This is particularly relevant to me now during COVID-19 as I can examine the difference in traditional epidemiological measures and reflect on how dissimilar the outcomes of this pandemic might be if we were reliant on astrology to assess the risk of this pandemic.

I believe my haiku resonates with Myla’s as she touches on the lack of readiness and shortcomings in public health and the current COVID-19 pandemic (Freed et al. 2020) This is particularly relevant to my article as there was a global lack of readiness and many quantitative shortcomings in the determining the risk and severity of the Bubonic Plague as well as COVID-19. Kandel, Chungong, Omaar, and Xing (2020) found that nearly half of all countries had a lack of operational readiness for COVID-19, suggesting a much-needed collaboration between countries to strengthen global outbreak control readiness.

This evidence has exposed the weaknesses and lack of international cooperation in the readiness for global health outbreaks. This suggests public health research must engage in more national and international preparation and planning to reduce the burden of disease and protect the health of citizens around the world. A systematic measurement of outbreaks may help pinpoint critical areas. Data can be cross-referenced for particular behavioral, social, and environmental characteristics to determine patterns of infections.

References

Freed, J, Kwon, S, Jacobs El, H, Gottlieb, M & Roth, R 2020, ‘Which country is truly developed? COVID-19 has answered the question’, Annals of Global Health, vol. 86, no. 1, pp. 51.

Kandel, N, Chungong, S, Omaar, A & Xing, J 2020, ‘Health security capacities in the context of COVID-19 outbreak: an analysis of International Health Regulations annual report data from 182 countries ’, The Lancet, vol. 395, no. 10229, pp. 1047-1053.

Pfeffer, M 2020, Before epidemiologists began modeling disease, it was the job of astrologers, viewed 26 July 2020, https://theconversation.com/before-epidemiologists-began-modelling-disease-it-was-the-job-of-astrologers-137895

 

Last Updated on August 8, 2022

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