Interpretation of a movie

Develop an interpretation of a movie by nesting that video text in a context—an outside story or body of research that deepens our understanding of the movie’s idea.

You will have to present a coherent depiction of the context you choose, in addition to clear, rigorous representations of the film and written texts you are incorporating. You will also need a beginning that spells out the question or problem you are pursuing; a middle that uses evidence to help you think in new and surprising ways; and an ending that signals your new perspective on or understanding of your subject.

Whatever context you choose, you will need to help an unfamiliar reader understand it and see how it can serve as a lens through which to see the movie you are reading closely.

 

Requirements:

At least 4 written texts (including one from the Broadview Anthology).

MLA format & citation.

Length: 6 – 8 doubled-spaced pages; at least 10 paragraphs

 

You have already written a good deal for this first project of the semester: homework exercises, a collage piece, free-writes, in-class reflections. Now it’s time to write the first full draft of your Developing Contexts essay. This draft should clearly articulate the problem you are pursuing, while shedding light on related problems explored by your movie and the arguments that movie and other texts offer for our consideration.

Work to show your reader the problem or question you are pursuing, and your argument about that problem (or answer to that question).

For this draft, keep in mind the Rule of Two: if you are not sufficiently analyzing your movie or other evidence in your draft, begin to address this lack and write more sentences of analysis and reflection.

Incorporate four texts: your movie, and three ancillary texts (including one from Broadview).

Length of draft 1: At least 5 compelling pages, double-spaced, MLA-style.

 

Notes on expectations for the Final Draft:

Your final draft will be due Wednesday, 10/10.

Your final draft should be 6-8 pages (probably 10-15 paragraphs) and should include a minimum of five sources (including your movie).

A successful final draft will include:

  • a description and assessment of a particular context that helps us understand the ideas and argument of your movie;
  • clear representation and analysis of the movie and four additional texts;
  • citation and incorporation of written sources using summary, paraphrase & quotation;
  • an interpretive argument, derived from the movie in context, that touches on the broader implications of the movie’s idea;
  • clarity of sentence-level writing and thinking;
  • a clear beginning, middle and end.

Last Updated on October 1, 2018 by EssayPro