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How Andrew Jackson is symbolic of certain ideas and trends in the early 19th century

Andrew Jackson, one historian has written, was the “symbol for an age.” How might Jackson be considered symbolic of certain ideas and trends in the early nineteenth century? Can you think of other appropriate symbolic figures for that period?

Jackson’s presidency was significant. His election to this office ushered in an era of democracy. During Jackson’s eight years in office, he was responsible for the introduction of a new political party, the Democratic Party and led it to national dominance. He established a democratic procedure for selecting presidential candidates that endured until 1876.

Andrew Jackson has been called a “man who led his country into its past. “His life and career were so richly symbolic of many of the larger themes running through American society at that time.” Jackson’s presidency was a significant event in the history of processes in the nation. His election to this office ushered in an era of democracy: an era marked by a broadened electorate, expanded political activity, and renewed popular interest in public affairs (Rogin, 2017). As president, he introduced the first party system to the country and became the leader of his party. His uncompromising stand on issues of civil rights, tariff reform, finance, and slavery established him as one of the most controversial figures in nineteenth century American politics. He will long be remembered as the hero who saved the nation from “bankruptcy. ”

Jackson’s life and career were so richly symbolic of many of the larger themes running through American society at that time. He was born poor, and his martial skills helped him climb to a position of relative wealth. He had little formal education, but his thirst for knowledge led him to study law, become a well-read man, and rise to prominence in Tennessee politics (Rogin, 2017).

He talked about “the tree of liberty” as a symbol of his native state and the United States, but he also used symbols like the tree of life and Noah’s ark to make plain that he believed in the permanence of this nation. Jackson was a self-made man, a man who made his own way in the world. He was from a place that people considered “backwoods” and lived in an era when many Americans still considered themselves “frontiersmen.” He was educated, courageous, and bold. Jackson lived and worked in a place where slavery was common, but never owned a slave (Thompson, 2018). When the Nullification Crisis occurred he called South Carolina his “native state,” and when he led troops into Florida, he told his soldiers that they were fighting to maintain the Union. Jackson became the symbol for an age.

Jackson’s election to this office ushered in an era of democracy. During Jackson’s eight years in office, he was responsible for the introduction of a new political party, the Democratic Party, and led it to national dominance. He established a democratic procedure for selecting presidential candidates that endured until 1876. Jackson was very successful in pursuing his policies as president. He is perhaps best remembered for removing Indians from the southeastern United States (Thompson, 2018).

Other Appropriate Symbolic Figures in the 19th Century

There are several other appropriate symbolic figures for the early nineteenth century. You might want to consider Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, or Abraham Lincoln.

Thomas Jefferson represented many of the ideals of the time. He was responsible for writing the Declaration of Independence, which is one of the most important documents in United States history. This document was a statement about freedom and equality for all people in this country. Jefferson also wrote about democracy in his book Notes on The State of Virginia (Marriott, 2016). He believed that every person should have equal rights at all times, and argued for the formation of a new government where that would be true.

James Madison was the president of the United States from 1809 to 1817. He was a very educated man, and he wrote many articles and letters regarding the political ideas and issues of his time. He supported many of the programs established by Washington, but he also took an active role in running the country. Madison believed in a strong central government, but he also had faith in state governments. He believed in a limited federal government that would not interfere with the affairs of state. Madison also supported a Bill of Rights, which protected people’s rights. He felt that these rights were very important, and he wanted them protected so that no one could take them away (Marriott, 2016).

Abraham Lincoln was president from 1861 to 1865. He lived through one of the most tumultuous times in United States history when the nation was torn apart by the Civil War. Lincoln was a very shrewd man, and he knew that the North needed to focus on one issue to prevent further destruction: winning the war. Lincoln put all of his energy into winning the war, and he did it so well that the country is still grateful for his efforts. He believed in equality for all Americans, and he made sure that everyone had their chance at success. Lincoln was a great role model for Americans during this time because he showed them how to be strong leaders even under extreme circumstances (Marriott, 2016).

In conclusion, the nineteenth century was a time full of important people and events. These historical figures represent the ideas, ideals, and issues of the time. They were leaders who touched the lives of many people, and they left a legacy that still exists today. The nineteenth century is also a time when new ideas were nurtured and developed into a truly democratic society. The nineteen century is one that Americans can be proud of.

References

Rogin, M. P. (2017). Fathers and children: Andrew Jackson and the subjugation of the American Indian. Routledge. https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/mono/10.4324/9780203792056/fathers-children-michael-paul-rogin

Thompson, S., & Barchiesi, F. (2018). Harriet Tubman and Andrew Jackson on the twenty-dollar bill: A monstrous intimacy. Open Cultural Studies2(1), 417-429. https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/culture-2018-0038/html

Marriott, A. V. (2016). Glorious Victory: Andrew Jackson and the Battle of New Orleans by Donald R. Hickey. Journal of the Early Republic36(4), 832-835. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/643520/summary

Last Updated on November 17, 2022

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