Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus( MRSA)

An exploration of 3rd year diagnostic radiography students’ confidence regarding Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus( MRSA) and infection control.

One of the main reasons why I have chosen this particular issue is because at present MRSA is still an on-going problem for organisations world-wide (Makison, 2006) and has become a public health concern in many parts of the world (MacDonald, 2008). It is an area of the curriculum that I have had to work hard in to become confident and the study will aim to discover if this is common throughout the cohort. The study is important because radiography students do come into contact with MRSA patients and their role is to ensure that they minimise the spread of infection and at the same time protect themselves.

The study will be conducted via a self- administered anonymous questionnaire using the quantitative data analysis. The researcher will be using a descriptive statistical approach to analyse the data, as this analysis permits simpler interpretation of the data (Creswell, 2013).

A survey containing closed and open ended questions will be provided to students to gauge their confidence about MRSA and infection control. The questionnaire consists of 10 questions. The researcher will use a Likert scales to obtain the information, as this scale permits the participants to determine their level of confidence.
The target population are third year diagnostic radiography students. The questionnaire will be handed out to students in a classroom. Participants will also be informed that they can withdraw at any stage.

Plan:

We will start with Critical Review of Literature.

Evaluation of relevant published work that has been done in your researcher area. You should include a brief search strategy. In evaluating literature, you are required to provide justification by critical analysis. You do not need to quote every piece of literature you find, but select those which are most relevant and which give a representative sample of all viewpoints. You should demonstrate that you have evaluated the material you quote, e.g. the techniques employed and the claims made within that literature. References to websites should be limited. Google and Wikipedia should not be used.
Instruction files

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his is the guidelines that i have send to the write. first of all he did not follow this guidelines at all. Project write up requirements (please follow this guidelines. ) Title is : An exploration of 3rd year diagnostic radiography students’ confidence regarding Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus( MRSA) and infection control. • The Abstract ~ summarises the research question and rationale for conducting the research. It must outline the method, results, findings and the conclusions of your project. It is usually approximately 250 words. It should not exceed 400 words. Include key words at the end of the abstract. • REMEMBER THIS IS USUALLY WRITTEN LAST

1) Introduction • Aim • Objectives • Introduction/ Background ~ puts the research in context by giving background information (properly referenced), i.e. sets the scene for the research to follow. It should also include the aims and objectives of study and where appropriate, the hypothesis and null hypothesis. 2) Search strategy 3) Litterature review • Critical Review of Literature ~ evaluation of relevant published work that has been done in your research area. You should include a brief search strategy. In evaluating literature, you are required to provide justification by critical analysis. You should demonstrate that you have evaluated the material you quote, e.g. the techniques employed and the claims made within that literature. References to websites should be limited.

Google and Wikipedia should not be used. 4) Methodology • Choice of metholodology • Ethical consideration • Design of test tool • Question types and content • Sample population • Selection and Recruitment of Participants • Analysis • Research methods ~ contain a detailed summary and critical analysis of the method you followed. It also contains a justification of why you designed your study in a particular way. For example you should give reasons, with appropriate support from quoted literature, as to why you used questionnaires instead of interviews, why you chose particular question / answer categories, why you selected a particular sample group as your participants etc. You must also justify why you analysed the data in a particular way. This highlights your knowledge and understanding of the research process and reference should be made to appropriate supporting evidence.

Your methods may include:- a) The design of the study b) Identification of variables and other weaknesses, and discuss how you have attempted to minimise them. (e.g. large number of participants recruited, use of questionnaires, follow-up phone calls to non-respondents etc.) c) Participants (if used) You need to identify and rationalise your choice of sample, e.g. convenience sample, cluster, etc., the number of participants recruited, how they were recruited etc. d) Materials / apparatus used. A detailed summary and explanation of equipment used with diagrams if appropriate. Questionnaires / lists/ instructions etc must be included in the appendices. Where a questionnaire is the research tool used, you will need to not only justify the inclusion of specific questions but also discuss the appropriateness of the types of questions used, e.g. why did you use ‘open-ended’ questions? e) Procedure.

A step-by-step explanation of the method that was used to conduct the study should be included so that it may be replicated, including how the data were analysed. For example both descriptive and inferential statistical tests were employed using SPSS for Windows TM and related t test on x & y; X2 on… etc. You must indicate whether ethical implications for research involving use of human subjects have been considered and include relevant supporting documents, as appendices, to evidence this. In addition, all permission letters/ forms and other relevant documents should be included as appendices as well. 5) Results Results ~ this contains the collated, summarised results, presented in the clearest, most appropriate manner. It is a good idea to present findings in a logical, sensible order that relates to the question(s) posed. Depending on the nature of the research, this probably will not be raw data.

For example, it is not necessary to include the transcription of interviews, merely the grouped data extracted from them. You should retain copies of the transcripts however, in case they are requested. In a quantitative study the raw data may be incorporated in the appendices. It is important to be consistent in presenting results. For example, do not mix bar charts, pie charts and line graphs for similar data. You should present standardised statistical data where appropriate, e.g. mean, and standard deviation. 6) Results analysis and discussion • Critical Discussion & Analysis ~ This is the part of the project which most clearly demonstrates your ability to discuss, evaluate, analyse and interpret the results in relation to:- a) the original experimental prediction b) findings of previous studies c) theoretical issues raised in the introduction / literature review.

Take care to discuss your results, not simply describe them. Refer back to the results and literature review, but it is not accepted practice to introduce new material from the literature at this point unless a relevant article has been published since the original literature search. Where your findings differ to previous published evidence, you should explain and justify why this might be. Include any real or perceived weaknesses of your research design. 7) Conclusion and Recommendation. Conclusion and recommendation/s ~ This is the final summary of your work and is the only section where you can express an opinion based on the global application of the results.

This chapter should summarise the extent to which the aims were achieved as well as whether your question(s) has been fully answered. It should end with recommendations for further work 8) References and Bibliography ~ Should be presented according to School of Health and Social Work- Referencing Guidelines 2013-2014. All references that have been cited or quoted in the text should appear under ‘References.’ All other literature sources that you have consulted during the course of your research but did not directly use in your write up, must be listed under ‘Bibliography.’ 9)Bibliography • 10) Appendices~ should be presented in numerical order as cited within the body of the text. Literature review.

Title of project: An exploration of 3rd year diagnostic radiography students’ confidence regarding Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus( MRSA) and infection control. We will start will the literature review. Greater use of structure recommended.(please follow these points when you are doing literature review. • Introduction- include literature search strategy. • MRSA • Why is it important • Students confidence • Confidence MRSA • Student confidence + MRSA With the literature review you will need to relate with the study. How is this relevant to the study? • demonstrates that you know the field.

This means more than reporting what you’ve read and understood. Instead, you need to read it critically and to write in such a way that shows you have a feel for the area; you know what the most important issues are and their relevance to your work, you know the controversies, you know what’s neglected, you have the anticipation of where it’s being taken. • justifies the reason for your research. This is closely connected with demonstrating that you know the field. It is the knowledge of your field which allows you to identify the gap which your research could fill. However, it is not enough to find a gap. You have also to be able to convince your reader that what you are doing is important and needs to be done. The purpose of the literature review remains the same regardless of the research method you use. It tests your research question against what already is known about your subject. Considering your question. If you find that your research question has not been answered satisfactorily by someone else, then search for these answers:

• What is known about my subject? • What is the chronology of the development of knowledge about my subject? • Are there any gaps in knowledge of my subject? Which openings for research have been identified by other researchers? How do I intend to bridge the gaps? • Is there a consensus on relevant issues? Or is there significant debate on issues? What are the various positions? • What is the most fruitful direction I can see for my research as a result of my literature review? What directions are indicated by the work of other reseaerch. please look at this guidelines and read the work . 210 From: Fatuma Hassan (Customer to Admin) (31.52.114.8, United Kingdom) Date: 2014-03-03 15:46 Subject: Re: Order progress – File from your writer message read hi can you forward this to the QAD people’ this is the guidelines that i have send to the write. first of all he did not follow this guidelines at all. Project write up requirements (please follow this guidelines. ) Title is :

An exploration of 3rd year diagnostic radiography students’ confidence regarding Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus( MRSA) and infection control. • The Abstract ~ summarises the research question and rationale for conducting the research. It must outline the method, results, findings and the conclusions of your project. It is usually approximately 250 words. It should not exceed 400 words. Include key words at the end of the abstract. • REMEMBER THIS IS USUALLY WRITTEN LAST 1) Introduction • Aim • Objectives • Introduction/ Background ~ puts the research in context by giving background information (properly referenced), i.e. sets the scene for the research to follow. It should also include the aims and objectives of study and where appropriate, the hypothesis and null hypothesis. 2) Search strategy 3) Litterature review • Critical Review of Literature ~ evaluation of relevant published work that has been done in your research area. You should include a brief search strategy.

In evaluating literature, you are required to provide justification by critical analysis. You should demonstrate that you have evaluated the material you quote, e.g. the techniques employed and the claims made within that literature. References to websites should be limited. Google and Wikipedia should not be used. 4) Methodology • Choice of metholodology • Ethical consideration • Design of test tool • Question types and content • Sample population • Selection and Recruitment of Participants • Analysis • Research methods ~ contain a detailed summary and critical analysis of the method you followed. It also contains a justification of why you designed your study in a particular way.

For example you should give reasons, with appropriate support from quoted literature, as to why you used questionnaires instead of interviews, why you chose particular question / answer categories, why you selected a particular sample group as your participants etc. You must also justify why you analysed the data in a particular way. This highlights your knowledge and understanding of the research process and reference should be made to appropriate supporting evidence. Your methods may include:- a) The design of the study b) Identification of variables and other weaknesses, and discuss how you have attempted to minimise them. (e.g. large number of participants recruited, use of questionnaires, follow-up phone calls to non-respondents etc.) c) Participants (if used) You need to identify and rationalise your choice of sample, e.g. convenience sample, cluster, etc., the number of participants recruited, how they were recruited etc. d) Materials / apparatus used.

A detailed summary and explanation of equipment used with diagrams if appropriate. Questionnaires / lists/ instructions etc must be included in the appendices. Where a questionnaire is the research tool used, you will need to not only justify the inclusion of specific questions but also discuss the appropriateness of the types of questions used, e.g. why did you use ‘open-ended’ questions? e) Procedure. A step-by-step explanation of the method that was used to conduct the study should be included so that it may be replicated, including how the data were analysed. For example both descriptive and inferential statistical tests were employed using SPSS for Windows TM and related t test on x & y; X2 on… etc.

You must indicate whether ethical implications for research involving use of human subjects have been considered and include relevant supporting documents, as appendices, to evidence this. In addition, all permission letters/ forms and other relevant documents should be included as appendices as well. 5) Results Results ~ this contains the collated, summarised results, presented in the clearest, most appropriate manner. It is a good idea to present findings in a logical, sensible order that relates to the question(s) posed.

Depending on the nature of the research, this probably will not be raw data. For example, it is not necessary to include the transcription of interviews, merely the grouped data extracted from them. You should retain copies of the transcripts however, in case they are requested. In a quantitative study the raw data may be incorporated in the appendices. It is important to be consistent in presenting results. For example, do not mix bar charts, pie charts and line graphs for similar data. You should present standardised statistical data where appropriate, e.g. mean, and standard deviation. 6) Results analysis and discussion

• Critical Discussion & Analysis ~ This is the part of the project which most clearly demonstrates your ability to discuss, evaluate, analyse and interpret the results in relation to:- a) the original experimental prediction b) findings of previous studies c) theoretical issues raised in the introduction / literature review. Take care to discuss your results, not simply describe them. Refer back to the results and literature review, but it is not accepted practice to introduce new material from the literature at this point unless a relevant article has been published since the original literature search. Where your findings differ to previous published evidence, you should explain and justify why this might be. Include any real or perceived weaknesses of your research design. 7) Conclusion and Recommendation.

Conclusion and recommendation/s ~ This is the final summary of your work and is the only section where you can express an opinion based on the global application of the results. This chapter should summarise the extent to which the aims were achieved as well as whether your question(s) has been fully answered. It should end with recommendations for further work 8) References and Bibliography ~ Should be presented according to School of Health and Social Work- Referencing Guidelines 2013-2014. All references that have been cited or quoted in the text should appear under ‘References.’ All other literature sources that you have consulted during the course of your research but did not directly use in your write up, must be listed under ‘Bibliography.’ 9)Bibliography • 10) Appendices~ should be presented in numerical order as cited within the body of the text. Literature review.

Title of project: An exploration of 3rd year diagnostic radiography students’ confidence regarding Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus( MRSA) and infection control. We will start will the literature review. Greater use of structure recommended.(please follow these points when you are doing literature review. • Introduction- include literature search strategy. • MRSA • Why is it important • Students confidence

• Confidence MRSA • Student confidence + MRSA With the literature review you will need to relate with the study. How is this relevant to the study?

• demonstrates that you know the field. This means more than reporting what you’ve read and understood. Instead, you need to read it critically and to write in such a way that shows you have a feel for the area; you know what the most important issues are and their relevance to your work, you know the controversies, you know what’s neglected, you have the anticipation of where it’s being taken.

• justifies the reason for your research. This is closely connected with demonstrating that you know the field. It is the knowledge of your field which allows you to identify the gap which your research could fill. However, it is not enough to find a gap. You have also to be able to convince your reader that what you are doing is important and needs to be done.

The purpose of the literature review remains the same regardless of the research method you use. It tests your research question against what already is known about your subject. Considering your question. If you find that your research question has not been answered satisfactorily by someone else, then search for these answers:

• What is known about my subject?

• What is the chronology of the development of knowledge about my subject?

• Are there any gaps in knowledge of my subject? Which openings for research have been identified by other researchers? How do I intend to bridge the gaps?

• Is there a consensus on relevant issues? Or is there significant debate on issues? What are the various positions?

• What is the most fruitful direction I can see for my research as a result of my literature review? What directions are indicated by the work of other reseaerch. please look at this guidelines and read the work .

Last Updated on February 11, 2019 by Essay Pro