Data-Driven Organizations

Data-Driven Organizations– Instructions

 

Overview:

 

Write a 3–5-page description of the steps you would take to resolve the issue presented in a scenario related to the use of data in health care organizations.

 

    • Competency: Evaluate the role of quality assurance in the improvement of patient outcomes.
  • Describe how health care organizations rely on data to ensure that patients receive evidence-based care.
  • Describe how health care organizations rely on data to reduce variation in treatment.
  • Describe how health care organizations understand the relationship between intervention and outcomes.
  • Competency: Analyze the major components of a comprehensive quality assurance and risk management organizational plan.
    • Describe how health care organizations rely on data to identify problems and evaluate solutions.
  • Competency: Evaluate common internal sources of quantitative data used for internal decision-making.
    • Describe how health care organizations rely on data to communicate leadership goals.
    • Describe how health care organizations rely on data to compare one organization to similar organizations across the country.
    • Describe how health care organizations rely on data to improve accountability of staff.

 

Context

 

According to Dlugacz (2006), health care organizations rely on data to:

  • Define value for their products.
  • Improve market share.
  • Maintain efficient use of resources.
  • Ensure that patients receive evidence-based care.
  • Reduce variation in treatment.
  • Understand the relationship between intervention and outcomes.
  • Communicate leadership goals.
  • Compare one organization to other similar organizations across the country.
  • Improve accountability of staff.
  • Identify problems and evaluate solutions.
  • Establish guidelines for delivery of care.

 

Modern health care facilities are data driven. Quality data may be combined with financial data to understand how care is delivered and to gauge possible improvements. Depending upon leadership goals and on levels of accountability for improvements, data-driven initiatives may be used to inform patient care along with organizational viability.

 

Collaborative efforts have worked well to drive quality initiatives. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has led many innovative, national, quality-driven initiatives. One of the most noteworthy is the 5 Million Lives Campaign (IHI, n.d.[a]). This campaign was a voluntary initiative designed to protect five million patients from medical harm in two years. This program ran December 2006 through December 2008. The data and outcomes continue to be tracked to this day. Based on these efforts, IHI developed the IHI Improvement Map. IHI invites hospital facilities to participate in the Improvement Map activities.

 

The failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) tool is one measure for tracking and reporting on operational success. For example, Baptist Memorial Hospital in Southaven, Mississippi, began a FMEA project to track patients with acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The goal of this community hospital was to ensure that all AMI patients were treated within 90 minutes or less from arrival to the emergency department to the cardiac catheterization lab. The FMEA tool system helped this hospital achieve its goal (IHI, n.d.[b]).

 

References

 

Dlugacz, Y. D. (2006). Measuring health care: Using quality data for operational, financial, and clinical improvement. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). (n.d.[a]). 5 million lives campaign. Retrieved from http://www.ihi.org/engage/initiatives/completed/5MillionLivesCampaign/Pages/default.aspx

 

Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). (n.d.[b]). FMEA tool: AMI care: Door-to-balloon in 120 minutes. Retrieved from http://app.ihi.org/Workspace/tools/fmea/ViewTool.aspx?ToolId=1958

 

Suggested Resources (not required):

 

    • American Society for Quality. (n.d.). Plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle. Retrieved from http://www.asq.org/learn-about-quality/project-planning-tools/overview/pdca-cycle.html
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Office of Inspector General (OIG). (2014). Work plan for fiscal year 2014. Retrieved from http://oig.hhs.gov/reports-and-publications/archives/workplan/2014/Work-Plan-2014.pdf.
    • eHealth Initiative. (2007). Blueprint: Building consensus for common action. Retrieved from .
    • Health Care Compliance Association. (2008). Health Care Compliance Association member survey. Retrieved from .
    • Health Care Compliance Association. (2014). Code of ethics for health care compliance professionals. Retrieved from .
    • Institute of Medicine (IOM). (2000). Executive summary of to err is human. Retrieved from http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/1999/To-Err-is-Human/To%20Err%20is%20Human%201999%20%20report%20brief.pdf
    • Institute of Medicine (IOM). (2009). The learning healthcare system workshop summary. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11903.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). (2008). Fact sheet on the National Practitioner Data Bank. Retrieved from .
    • Office of the Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), & American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA). (2011). The health care director’s compliance duties: A continued focus of attention and enforcement. Retrieved from https://oig.hhs.gov/compliance/compliance-guidance/docs/Health_Care_Directors_Compliance_Duties.pdf.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ). (n.d.). National healthcare quality & disparities report. Retrieved from http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/.
    • U.S. Department of Justice: U.S. Attorney’s Office: District of Maryland. (2009). Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center settles false claims act case. Retrieved from http://www.justice.gov/archive/usao/md/news/archive/JohnsHopkinsBayviewMedicalCenterSettlesFalseClaimsActCase.html.
    • Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). (2014). 5 million lives campaign. Retrieved from http://www.ihi.org/engage/initiatives/completed/5MillionLivesCampaign/Pages/default.aspx
  • 5 million lives campaign. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2014. (Available on www.IHI.org).
  • Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). (2014). IHI improvement map. Retrieved from http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Programs/ImprovementMap
    • IHI improvement map. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2014. (Available on www.IHI.org).
  • Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN). (2013). Just culture tool kit. Retrieved from .
  • Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA). (2013). Retrieved from http://www.hcca-info.org/.
  • Institute for Healthcare Improvement. (2014). Develop a culture of safety. Retrieved from http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/Changes/DevelopaCultureofSafety.aspx
    • Develop a culture of safety. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2014. (Available on www.IHI.org).
  • Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). 2014–2015 targeted medication safety best practices for hospitals. Retrieved from http://www.ismp.org/Tools/BestPractices/default.aspx
  • S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA): National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB). (n.d.). Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank. Retrieved from http://www.npdb-hipdb.hrsa.gov/.
  • S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Office of Inspector General (OIG). (n.d.). Compliance education materials: Compliance 101. Retrieved from http://oig.hhs.gov/compliance/101.
  • S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Office of Inspector General (OIG). (n.d.). Corporate integrity agreement documents. Retrieved from http://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/cia/cia_list.asp.
  • S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). (2014). 2014 Annual report: Additional opportunities to reduce fragmentation, overlap, and duplication and achieve other financial benefits. Retrieved from www.gao.gov/assets/670/662327.pdf.
  • Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). (2014). Reducing door-to-balloon time for AMI patients. Retrieved from http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/ImprovementStories/ReducingDoortoBalloonTimeforAMIPatientsatBaptistMemorialDeSoto.aspx
    • Reducing door-to-balloon time for AMI patients. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2014. (Available on www.IHI.org).

 

 

 

Instructions:

 

Consider the following scenario:

 

Imagine you are the CEO of an ambulatory care clinic. Your facility provides outpatient, orthopedic procedures. Your facility directly competes with the local hospital. The hospital participates in several quality initiatives and is accredited by The Joint Commission (TJC). The hospital has created care maps to ensure evidence-based care is provided to all orthopedic patients. Your facility is owned by a physician group. This same physician group also staffs the hospital. You are not aware of any types of care maps or evidence-based practice policies and procedures within your ambulatory clinic.

 

The hospital administrator is coming to meet with you in two days. This administrator is concerned about the financial loss of patients from the hospital due to the increasing trend of these patients being served by the ambulatory care clinic. The physicians have come to you to ask for a positive solution.

 

Describe the steps (in prioritized order) you would take to resolve this current issue, address the following questions in your assessment:

    • What type of data will you collect?
    • How will you respond to issues of quality?
    • What do you project the outcome should be?

 

Additional Requirements
    • Include a title page and a references page.
    • Include an introductory paragraph and a concluding paragraph.
    • Include a minimum of 3 research resources.
    • Follow APA guidelines for style and formatting.
    • Ensure your finished assessment is 3–5 pages, excluding the title page and references page.

 

Last Updated on