Classroom Challenge 2 Academic success

Pease type up a 1200 word essay about academic success. Please consider the instructions on the attached Classroom Challenge 2 – academic success instructions.
This essay is about how to improve academic success in comprehension, vocabulary and exposure to non-fiction. There is a scenario attached that describes the background of the teacher and all other information. Look at the following discussion points in your writing, that is How to improve comprehension, how to develop vocabulary, how to increase exposure to nonfiction. There is a list of articles to refer to. This essay is written in APA format.

CLASSROOM CHALLENGE 2 – ACADEMIC SUCCESS INSTRUCTIONS
Using effective practices with students increases the likelihood of them participating in
instruction, and such participation can be a good predictor of achievement. The more engaged
students are with instruction, the greater the chance that they will experience academic success.
This module/week’s challenge addresses some ideas regarding academic success in the
classroom. Academic success for 6th grade will be explored in consideration of 3 topics:
(1) comprehension, (2) vocabulary, and (3) exposure to nonfiction. Read and study the provided
scenario as you consider how success will unfold in your classroom.
Specificity is important with this assignment; as you write your paper, you must continually ask
yourself “why” and “how”. In your challenge, you must separately discuss each goal you choose
as you consider what strategies you want to use for each goal. To earn full credit, your paper
must employ specific and quality discourse.
Include the following discussion points in your challenge:
A. Goal 1: Improving Comprehension
1. Identify your team’s goal for improving comprehension and the 2 strategies for
achieving this goal in the classroom.
2. With reliance on peer-reviewed research articles, explain why you chose each
strategy.
3. Present examples to demonstrate how each strategy you chose achieves your first
goal; use examples relative to the scenario.
4. Include discussion of how you can use the flipped classroom model to positively
impact the achievement of this goal.
5. Cite the research you use in your discussion and include a reference list of your
sources at the end of your paper.
B. Goal 2: Developing Vocabulary
1. Identify your team’s goal for developing vocabulary and the two strategies for
achieving this goal in the classroom.
2. With reliance on peer-reviewed research articles, explain why you chose each
strategy.
3. Present examples to demonstrate how each strategy you chose achieves your
second goal; use examples relative to the scenario.
4. Include discussion of how you can use project-based learning to positively impact
the achievement of this goal.
5. Cite the research you use in your discussion and include a reference list Of your
sources at the end of your paper.
C. Goal 3: Increasing Exposure to Nonfiction
1. Identify your team’s goal for increasing exposure to nonfictional works and the
two strategies for achieving this goal in the classroom.
2. With reliance on peer-reviewed research articles, explain why you chose each
strategy.
3. Present examples to demonstrate how each strategy you chose achieves your third
goal; use examples relative to the scenario.
4. Include discussion of how you can integrate technology to positively impact the
achievement of this goal.
5. Cite the research you use in your discussion and include a reference list of your
sources at the end of your paper.
The following are requirements for your paper:
A. Your paper must meet a minimum of 1,200 words (not including the title page, abstract
page, and reference page) and be formatted in current APA style.
B. You must use at least 4 sources in your paper:
1. 1 source must be the Bible. (Reference which translation you use, i.e. KJV, NKJV,
NIV, etc.)
2. 1 source must be the course textbook.
3. 1 source must come from the provided list of peer-reviewed research articles.
4. 1 source must be a peer-reviewed research article that you find on your own.
a. To assist you in your search for an article, you can access the leny Falwell
Library at htlpzf/libguides.Iibertv.edu/contcnt.php?pid1544015 to find peer-
reviewed journal articles.
b. The self-selected research article:
1) Must be peer-reviewed;
2) Must be published within the last 5 years; and
3) Must be at least 5 pages.
C. You must include at least 5 citations within your paper for the work you borrow from the
4 sources.
Submit your answers as a Microsoft Word document and attach using the assignment link
provided.
Submit your Classroom Challenge 2 by 11:59 pm. (ET) on Monday of Module/Week 4.

CLASSROOM CHALLENGE 2 SCENARIO- ACADEMIC SUCCESS
Consider that the new school year starts in just a few weeks, and you are standing in the doorway
of your new classroom at the school where you’ve been recently hired. You have been teaching
English for seven years, but this year you will be at a different school. Your former school was a
small, K-12, private Christian school, but this year you are at one of the public middle schools.
You feel blessed that you do not have to move, but the new setting has you feeling a little
anxious.
As a Christian teacher you try to demonstrate the love of Christ in all your lessons, but today you
wonder: Can 1 even say the word Jesus? What if a student approaches me about my faith? One
thing you enjoyed about teaching at a Christian school was being able to share your faith openly,
so you are uneasy about how this will look at your new school. You remind yourself that Jesus
is everywhere, so yes, He will be in this school, too. You silently pledge that you will not get so
uptight about sharing your faith that you forget to live it.
The other aspect that is different about your new position is that you will be teaching a single
grade level. The Christian school was small, and you were the only English teacher; your classes
were composed of mixed grade levels from 5th to 12“. At this school you are 1 of 12 English
teachers and are assigned to the 6th grade team; there are four teachers on your team.
In the 6lh grade literacy block you will be teaching a combination of topics in vocabulary
development and comprehension, written composition skills, and exploring fictional and
nonfictional works. Last spring the district decided that increasing comprehension would be a
high priority in its middle schools. You are familiar with each of these topics, and you are
already gathering ideas for improving the reading scores of your new students. Your
apprehension lies with the number of new approaches for delivering content that you will be
called on to learn and use. At your new-teacher summer workshops there is a focus on teachers
using different strategies to meet the needs of today’s diverse learners.
Your new school’s population looks very different from where you came. It has a diversity score
of 0.68, so there is a good chance that most of your classes will be comprised of different ethnic
groups. This is appealing to you, though, because at your former school most of the students
were of the same race and economic background, and few diverse teaching strategies were
needed for reaching students.
You are meeting with your team at the school today because the principal has instructed all
teams to lay out their plans for academic success in their classrooms this year. Your team leader
calls a meeting so that you can discuss ideas together. She begins the meeting by sharing last
year’s 5‘11 grade iReady results for reading. Her presentation is helpful because the program
produces a colored bar graph, and you can clearly see where the students in each of your classes
ended their previous year.
With regard to teaching comprehension, some of the English teachers at the school are using
computer software that delivers curriculum and training to teachers. Your team leader finds this
approach to be worthwhile, but she is not requiring the team to use it. She also tells you that the district’s reading coaches want you to use small group instruction in your classrooms. One
example she has for a small group work station is to use question sets assigned to quality articles.
By assigning each of the students in the groups a specific role, students can effectively discuss
the passage together, as guided by the question set provided at their station.
Your team leader reminds you that nonfiction passages are important for developing reading
skills, too, because reading and interacting with them on a regular basis builds stamina. She
specifically wants the team to take advantage of the school’s Literacy Lab for this purpose. If
you know the reading levels of your students, you can use that information to individualize
learning for them.
The team should now lay out their plan for academic success. You all agree that the first step
is to determine the academic goals for the 6’h grade, because these goals will drive the strategies
you select. As a reminder, the focus of these goals are comprehension, vocabulary
development, and nonfiction exploration. One of the teachers volunteers to search the online
library research articles with the most up-to-date classroom strategies. Another teacher suggests
increasing parental engagement would be helpful, and you suggest how you think using a
flipped classroom model might work.
You leave your meeting feeling energized. There are so many ideas available fin- teaching
strategies that it will be hard to choose only afiew. These teachers are committed to their
students! You are also thinking back to this morning, standing at your door musing about
sharing and living your faith. In consideration of Christ-centered teaching, how can your
strategies for teaching literacy demonstrate the love of Christ in your classroom journey to
academic success?

EDUC 304
CLASSROOM CHALLENGE 2 – ACADEMIC SUCCESS ARTICLES
Afflerbach, P., Cho, B., Kim, J ., Crassas, M. E., 85 Doyle, B. (2013). Reading: What Else
Matters besides Strategies and Skills?. Reading Teacher, 66(6), 440-448.
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db=eric&AN=EJ l 0 1 2760&site=ehost-live&scoge=site
Chen, C. & Chiu, C. (2016). Employing Intergroup Competition in Multi-touch Design-based
Learning to Foster Student Engagement, Learning Achievement, and Creativity.
Computers & Education, 103, 99-113.
httgzllezgronyiberty.edu/login?url=httpztflfmvwsciencedirect.com/science/article/Qii/SO36
0131516301658
Harbour, K.E., Evanovich, L. L., Sweigart, C.A., & Hughes, LE. (2015). A Brief Review of
Effective Teaching Practices that Maximize Student Engagement. Preventing School
Failure, 59( 1). 5-13.
httpzl/ezproxy.Iiberty.edu.f’login?url=http://www.tandfonline.com./doi/abs/10.1080/104598
8X.2014.919136
Jackson, V. (2016). Applying the Think-Aloud Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension of
Science Content. Current Issues in Education, 19(2).
httpzflezproxy.libertyedu’lOgin?url=http://search.ebscohosl.com/login.aspx?direct=true&
db=eric&AN=E.Il 103355&site=ehost-Iive&scoge=site
Lord, K. M. (2015) Determining the Main Idea: Instructional Strategies That Work, Kappa
Delta Pi Record, 51(3), 138-142. doirlo.1080/00228958.2015.Io56669
httpzlleZQroxy.Iiberty.edu11ogin?urlthtp:/.”www.tandfonlinecom/doi/pdF/ i 0. 1 080002289
5820151056669

Last Updated on February 14, 2019 by