Adapting Nanaue, Son of the Shark God

Adapting Nanaue, Son of the Shark God

Nanaue, the Shark Man, is an ancient Hawaiian legend (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. that is used today to inspire children of all races to honor their heritage and nurture their creativity (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

In more mainstream American culture, however, he has also been exploited as a comic book villain (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.is another link with similar information.

What has not happened in mainstream American popular culture is a positive representation of Nanaue and native Hawaiian male adolescence of the sort that we have seen recently for native Hawaiian female adolescence in the Disney film Moana (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Prompt: 

While Nanaue is an undeniably violent character who ultimately deserves his own destruction, how could we represent the full complexity of his violent and problematic character in a way that preserves the respect that Alfons L. Korn and his source narrator Mrs. E. M. Nakuina show in their telling of his legend. Describe and cite specific details from ONE (1) violent and/or dramatic scene from Alfons L. Korn’s “Son of the Shark God (A Mythological Legend of Hawaii) and compare it closely to ONE (1) mainstream American representation of a violent but sympathetic and complex male character from film, television, streaming video or other entertainment medium.

Your response must be about 500 words long.

ONE (1) point of this entry’s grade will be reserved for your use of at least TWO (2) in-text citations (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. of a quotation orparaphrase from your source or sources.

ONE (1) point of this entry’s grade will be reserved for a correctly formatted Works Cited(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

 

Last Updated on February 11, 2019 by EssayPro