Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

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Write a clinical article of 2500 words. It is therefore suggested to focus the article on an aspect of a clinical topic in depth rather than trying to cover the whole topic.
TOPIC: Focus on the care of a patient with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and discuss the treatment in the acute phase. Explore risk factors and investigations if need be.
The clinical article should include the latest evidence-based guidelines /research relating to the topic – 22 references minimum.

TOPIC:
Clinical articles should be 2500 words. It is therefore suggested that you focus your article on an aspect of a clinical topic in depth rather than trying to cover the whole topic.
Focus on the care of a patient with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and discuss the treatment in the acute phase. We can explore risk factors and investigations if need be.
A clinical article should include the latest evidence-based guidelines /research relating to the topic – 22 references minimum.

Instructions to Authors

Aims and scope of the journal
BJCardN is a monthly clinical and professional journal for nurses who wish to be fully informed of developments in cardiac nursing.

The journal aims to incorporate the different contexts in which nurses may encounter patients with cardiovascular related conditions, whether working in a hospital-based unit or ward or within a primary care setting. It embraces practice within the UK and overseas.

General presentation guidance
All articles should be submitted in Ariel 12 font and at least 1.5 or double line spacing, formatted for A4 paper, and all pages should be numbered. Please avoid naming individuals, trusts and hospitals to preserve anonymity. All articles should be submitted online at:
http://www.epress.ac.uk/bjcardn/webforms/author.php

Title page
The title page – which should be submitted as a separate page – must include:
1. Title of the article.
2. The names of the authors (with initials or given names, whichever is preferred).
3. Institutional affiliation of each author.
4. Full details of each author’s current appointment.
5. Name, postal and e-mailaddress and contact telephone number of the author responsible for correspondence (to be published if the article is accepted).

Abstract/summary
An abstract of no more than 150 words should be submitted on a separate page giving a brief outline of the content of the article. This should be structured with appropriate headings for research articles (see instructions below).

Key words
Please supply 5 suitable key words, which give an overview of the article giving consideration to how this article could be accessed via a literature search.

Introduction
The introduction should be designed to develop readers’ interest in the article and tell them something about the way it is handled. It should also state the main question or questions that the article sets out to answer where applicable.

Body of text
Headings can help to provide structure to your article and guide the reader to particular sections. See specific information related to different types of articles for suggested headings.

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Conclusions and recommendations
Your conclusions should be succinct and logically ordered. Identify gaps in knowledge and suggest future initiatives.

Key point sentences
Please supply 5–8 key bulletpoint sentences that summarize the major themes of your article. These will appear at the end of the article.

Tables and illustrations
These should be included separately at the end of your article.
Appropriate and clear tables and illustrations can be a great help to readers. It is the author’s responsibility to ensure that written permission is received from the copyright holder for the reproduction of figures and tables before submission.

Illustrations
1. Electronic (JPEG or GIF format) illustrations may be used. Unfortunately we are unable to use hard copies.
2. Colour photographs of authors are desirable but not essential. Please submit with your article.
3. If a figure has been published previously, acknowledge and/or reference the original source and submit written permission from the copyright holder to reproduce the material.
4. In the case of clinical photography, written consent from the patient will be required before publication.
5. Figures should be numbered consecutively, in order of their first citation in the text.
6. Figures and pictures should be incorporated into the submitted text. For the review process please ensure that these are of low resolution to keep the overall file size to a minimum. Higher resolution figures can be submitted at a later date if the article is accepted for publication.

Tables
1. These should also be appropriately labelled and numbered consecutively, in order of their first citation in the text.
2. Please explain in footnotes all abbreviations that are used in each table.
3. If you use data from another published or unpublished source, obtain permission and acknowledge fully.

 

References
The Harvard System must be used. Provide full details of the original source of the material used. Please ensure that references are presented as described below in detail. If they are not, we may refuse the article for publication.

In the text
1. Use the name and year (Harvard) system for references in the text:
As Black and White (1987) have shown…
As already reported (Black and White, 1987)…
2. For three or more authors print the first author’s name followed by et al, e.g. As Black et al (1987) have shown…
3. When several references are cited simultaneously, the order should be chronological.
4. When more than one reference for the same author within the same year are used, they should be noted in the order they appear in the text e.g. Bloggs (2004a) Bloggs (2004b)

In the reference list
1. Arrange references alphabetically by first author’s name.
2. Print the names and initials of all authors for references with six or fewer authors; for seven or more authors print the first three and add ‘et al’. As all references with three or more authors and the first same author will be cited in the text as ‘et al’, those references are arranged chronologically:
Black B (1987)…
Black B (1988)…
Black B, White W (1963)…
Black B, White W, Green G, Brown B, Tan T (1973)… Black B, Green G, Tan T (1974)…
3. The sequence for referencing a journal article is: author(s); year; title; journal; volume; issue (where applicable); first and last page numbers. The layout and punctuation are:
Harrison K, Jackson J (1994) The management of heart failure. Heart1(4): 14–8 and with the DOI number where applicable
For journal abbreviations, please refer to MEDLINE. For example, The American Journal of Cardiology will be abbreviated to Am J Cardiol.
4. The sequence, layout and punctuation for books are:
Personal author
Laidler P (1994) Cardiac Rehabilitation: Structure and Strategy. Chapman & Hall, London Editors
Cusack L, Singh S eds. (1994) HIV and Cardio-thoracic intervention: Practical
Approaches. Chapman & Hall, London: 125–6
Chapter in book
Samuels B (1979) Pulmonary complications in heart patients. In: Rand A, Long B, eds.
Management of Cardiac Patients. Butterworths, London: 387–95
5. Papers that have been submitted for publication but not yet accepted are not acceptable as references and must be discussed with the editors to ensure there are no potential copyright or conflict of interest issues. Similarly, ‘personal communication’ should be inserted in the text in parentheses.
6. Papers accepted but not yet published may be included in the references: Holmes J (in press) Cardiac surgery at the crossroads. Br J Nurs
7. Please reference online publications in the following style:
e.g.Taylor N (2002) Mapping cardiovascular research in the London Region.
http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidan ce/DH_4131600 Accessed 7 May 2008

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Additional information
Clinical article
Clinical articles should be between 2000–2500 words. It is therefore suggested that you focus your article on an aspect of a clinical topic in depth rather than trying to cover the whole topic. For example, if you were writing an article on acute coronary syndromes, it would be better to focus on the care of a patient with either non-ST elevation MI or ST elevation MI and then to discuss the treatment in the acute phase. Another article could then explore risk factors or investigations or rehabilitation. A clinical article should include the latest evidence-based guidelines /research relating to the topic.

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