Regulation of Internet Hate Sites

Regulation of Internet Hate Sites

A hate crime is commonly defined as “a criminal offense committed against persons, property, or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by an offender’s bias against an individual’s or a group’s perceived race, religion, ethnic/national origin, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation” (Taylor, Fritsch, Liederbach, & Holt, 2011, p. 192). Hate crimes are illegal and most states have hate crime statutes that provide enhanced penalties for these types of crimes. Contemporary technology allows hate to be spread farther and wider through the use of hate sites than can be done by word of mouth. These sites are accessible to anyone with a computer. While hate crimes are illegal and often carry harsh penalties, hate sites are not illegal. Those who launch hate sites rely on the U.S. Constitution and their right to freedom of speech as protection from the law.

For this Discussion, consider whether hate sites should be monitored and regulated. Think about whether or not monitoring and regulating these sites might infringe upon freedom of speech.

Reference: Taylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., Liederbach, J., & Holt, T. J. (2011). Digital crime and digital terrorism (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Post by Day 4 an explanation of whether or not hate sites should be monitored and regulated. Then explain whether or not monitoring and regulating hate sites might infringe upon freedom of speech.

Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the Learning Resources.

  • Course Text: Taylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., & Liederbach, J. (2015). Digital crime and digital terrorism.(3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
    • Chapter 9, “Anarchy and Hate on the World Wide Web”
  • Article: Bailey, J. (2004). Private regulation and public policy: Toward effective restriction of Internet hate propaganda. McGill Law Journal, 49(1), 59–103.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.
  • Article: Foderaro, L. W. (2010, September 29). Private moment made public, then a fatal jump. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/30/nyregion/30suicide.html
  • Article: Guichard, A. (2009). Hate crime in cyberspace: The challenges of substantive criminal law. Information & Communications Technology Law, 18(2), 201–234.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Communication & Mass Media Complete database.
  • Article: Hu, W. (2010, October 2). Legal debate swirls over charges in a student’s suicide. The New York Times, p. A15.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the ProQuest Central database.
  • Article: Perry, B., & Olsson, P. (2009). Cyberhate: The globalization of hate. Information & Communications Technology Law, 18(2), 185–199.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Computers & Applied Sciences Complete database.

 

Last Updated on February 11, 2019 by EssayPro