Human Behavior and the Social Environment

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A. Description of Course Content


Exploration of behavioral and social science knowledge of human behavior and development through the life
course. It examines major systems in society: individual, group, family, and community; and the diversity of
ethnicity, race, class, sexual orientation, and culture.


B. Student Learning Outcomes


This course meets the follow education policy, practice behaviors and accreditation policies of the
Council on Social Work Accreditation:


Educational Policy 2.1.1
Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.


[Social workers serve as representatives of the profession, its mission, and its core values. They know the
profession’s history. Social workers commit themselves to the profession’s enhancement and to their own
professional conduct and growth. Social workers:] 1. Engage in career-long learning.


Educational Policy 2.1.2Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice. [Social


workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making. Social
workers are knowledgeable about the value base of the profession, its ethical standards, and relevant law.
Social workers:] 1. Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice.
2. Make ethical decisions by applying standards of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics2
and, as applicable, of the International Federation of Social Workers/International Association of Schools of
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Social Work Ethics in Social Work, Statement of Principles.
3. Tolerate ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts; and
4. Apply strategies of ethical reasoning to arrive at principled decisions.


Educational Policy 2.1.4Engage diversity and difference in practice. [Social workers understand how


diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. The
dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including age, class, color,
culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology,
race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a
person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege,
power, and acclaim. Social workers:] 1. Recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or
create or enhance privilege and power.
2. Gain sufficient self-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with
diverse groups.
3. Recognize and communicate their understanding of the importance of difference in shaping life experiences.


Educational Policy 2.1.6Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.


[Social workers use practice experience to inform research, employ evidence-based interventions, evaluate
their own practice, and use research findings to improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Social
workers comprehend quantitative and qualitative research and understand scientific and ethical approaches to
building knowledge. Social workers:] 1. Use research evidence to inform practice. [Social workers are knowledgeable about human behavior across
the life course; the range of social systems in which people live; and the ways social systems promote or
deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being. Social workers apply theories and
knowledge from the liberal arts to understand biological, social, cultural, psychological, and spiritual
development. Social workers:]


Educational Policy 2.1.7Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.


1. Utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation.
2. Critique and apply knowledge to understand person and environment.


Educational Policy 2.1.9Respond to contexts that shape practice.

[Social workers are informed, resourceful, and proactive in responding to evolving organizational, community, and societal contexts at all
levels of practice. Social workers recognize that the context of practice is dynamic, and use knowledge and
skill to respond proactively. Social workers:] 1. Continuously discover, appraise, and attend to changing locales, populations, scientific and technological
developments, and emerging societal trends to provide relevant services.


Student Learning Outcomes:


Students will demonstrate comprehension of the major organizational scheme of social work: reciprocal
relationships between human behavior and the social environment.
Students will examine theories, concepts, and empirically-based knowledge related to individuals as they live
in various systems in their environment: families, groups, organizations, and communities.
Students will examine theoretical frameworks for understanding the interactions between and among the
various systems such as individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems.
Students will examine, apply, and illustrate theories, concepts, and empirically-based knowledge related to
individuals as they live in various systems in their environment: families, groups, organizations, and
communities.
Students will examine, apply, and illustrate the development of persons through the life span based on
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theories and empirical knowledge of biological sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual aspects of
development.
Students will examine, apply, and illustrate ways in which social systems promote or block the achievement
and maintenance of health and well being.
Students will distinguish among individuals in terms of race, ethnicity, national origin, social class, religion,
physical and mental ability, sexual orientation, and how a particular person is related or not to each area.
Students will describe in their own words what their views are of persons of different races, ethnicity,
national origin, social class, religion, physical or mental ability, and sexual orientation.
Students will distinguish among the codes and values in the NASW Code of Ethics which ones relate directly
to human diversity and regard for worth and dignity of all persons. They will assess and discuss what they
think about these requirements for all social workers and how they plan to apply them in their social work
practice to persons who are different from them.
Students will describe their plan for further knowledge development about human behavior and the social
environment and the life span.


C. Required Textbooks and Other Course Materials


Hutchison, E.D. (2015). Dimensions of human behavior: The changing life course (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage Publications. ISBN:9781483303901
Hutchison, Elizabeth D. (2015). Dimensions of human behavior: Person in environment life course (5th ed.)
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. ISBN: 9781483303918
Selected Articles.


D. Additional Recommended Textbooks and Other Course Materials


N/A
E. Descriptions of Major Assignments and Examinations
Please turn all assignments in on Blackboard
(1) Weekly Questions and Responses (120 points).
Includes designated skill(s) or behavior (s) from: Educational Policy 2.1.1(a); Educational Policy
2.1.9(a)
Students will be randomly assigned to answer questions about the readings each week. These questions will
require you to have read the material and to think critically about it. It is expected that all responses to
questions will be clearly written using correct spelling and grammar. Responses will vary in length but
generally, questions will require about a one-page response. All responses will be submitted to the discussion
board. It is expected that you will read the questions and responses of your classmates and respond to at
three of them with thoughtful comments and questions that reflect your knowledge of the readings. There are
14 weeks where we will have the discussion board operating. You must respond to questions and your
classmates at least 12 times throughout the semester. You may complete more than 12 questions and
responses and I will drop responses with lowest grades. Each question response and responses to your
classmates is worth 10 points (5 points for your response and 5 points for your comments to your classmates).
Responses to classmates entail at least one response to each posted question. Responses entail a thoughtful
comment that reflects knowledge of the material covered in the weekly readings. It is the quality of the
response that will be evaluated.
When writing your response to the weekly question, try to specifically answer the question. Cite the text or
readings where appropriate. Be clear about the distinction between your opinions and materials taken from
the text. It is helpful to state the person’s name when you are specifically responding to a person. If you are
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citing directly from the text, you need to cite the text (using APA).
All responses to weekly questions are due on Saturdays at 9AM of that week. All responses to classmates are
due on Mondays of the following week at 9am.
(2) Working with Diverse Groups and SW Values and Ethics. (40 points). This assignment assesses
course outcomes # 8 and 9.


Includes designated skill(s) or behavior (s) from: Educational Policy 2.1.2(a-d); Educational Policy


2.1.4(a-c); Educational Policy 2.1.6(a)
1. Discuss your experiences of working with or interaction with persons of a different race, ethnicity, sexual
orientation or ability than yourself. Discuss at least 2 experiences. What was the experience like for you?
Example: Discuss your experience with working or interacting with a gay man if you are a straight woman
and discuss your experiences working/interacting with a person who has a physical challenge if you have no
physical challenges. (10 points)
2. How did these experiences impact your view of persons different from yourself? What did you learn? (10
points)
3. Include specific entries in the NASW Code of Ethics that relate to human diversity with regard to the worth
and dignity of all persons. (6 points)
4. Cite at least two academic journal articles that relate to your experiences in working with persons different
than yourself. (10 points)
5. Writing-You are expected to use APA style of referencing and use correct grammar throughout the paper.(4
points
General guidelines for paper:
Papers should be 3-5 pages, usually 12 point font with 1 inch margins
First person is fine but also use APA…it does not forbid 1st person.
The paper works best if you talk about a specific experience in a professional capacity or work environment
but it is Ok to talk about an experience with a friend/roommate, etc. Just nobody you know too well!!! (i.e.,
not your mother)
Articles should be about the group you are doing your paper on…if about a lesbian woman, find articles on
lesbian women. If about a Native American coworker, find articles on Native Americans.
NASW code of ethics should be discussed. You can intertwine it throughout or discuss it in one section of the
paper.
Use headings in your paper.
Paper will be stronger if you talk about more than one experience. I suggest you discuss at least 2
experiences.
(3) Case Study I (100 points). This assignment assesses outcomes #1-4, 6.
Includes designated skill(s) or behavior (s) from: Educational Policy 2.1.1(a); Educational Policy
2.1.7(a-b); Educational Policy 2.1.4(a-c)
Write a case study on a small group, community, or organization. (8-10 pages). More specific detail is provided
on the assignment sheet at end of syllabus. (1) Apply 4 theories and 5 concepts from text material on the
selected target. Analyze your target using the text and course materials.. (2) Describe and illustrate ways in
which the small group, community, or organization promotes or blocks the achievement and maintenance of
health and well-being of participants.
(4) Case Study II (100 points). This assignment assesses outcomes # 1-7.
Includes designated skill(s) or behavior (s) from: Educational Policy 2.1.1(a); Educational Policy
2.1.7(a-b); Educational Policy 2.1.4(a-c)
Write a case study on a child, young adult, midlife adult, or older adult. (8-10 pages). More specific detail is
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provided on the assignment sheet at end of syllabus. .(1) Choose 3 theories and 5 concepts from the chapters
in the micro text on your target life stage. Also use pertinent material from lecture notes. (2) Discuss the
theories and concepts in detail and give examples of how the client demonstrates each theory, concept, and
race, ethnicity, national origin, social class, religion, physical and mental ability, and sexual orientation.
(3) Describe and illustrate ways in which social systems promote or block the achievement and maintenance of
health and well-being for the target person (s).
(5) Life Long Learning Paper (20) points Assesses outcome #10.
Includes designated skill(s) or behavior (s) from: Educational Policy 2.1.1(a); Educational Policy
2.1.7(a-b)
Write about your plan to further your knowledge development about human behavior and the social
environment following the conclusion of the class and graduate school. Minimum of 1 page.
All assignments will be submitted through the assignment section of the blackboard.
F. Attendance
At The University of Texas at Arlington, taking attendance is not required but attendance is a critical indicator
in student success. Each faculty member is free to develop his or her own methods of evaluating students’
academic performance, which includes establishing course-specific policies on attendance. However, while UT
Arlington does not require instructors to take attendance in their courses, the U.S. Department of Education
requires that the University have a mechanism in place to mark when Federal Student Aid recipients “begin
attendance in a course.” UT Arlington instructors will report when students begin attendance in a course as
part of the final grading process. Specifically, when assigning a student a grade of F, faculty report the last
date a student attended their class based on evidence such as a test, participation in a class project or
presentation, or an engagement online via Blackboard. This date is reported to the Department of Education
for federal financial aid recipients. As the instructor of this section,
Weekly check-in is expected.
G. Grading
TBA
Students are expected to keep track of their performance throughout the semester and seek guidance from
available sources (including the instructor) if their performance drops below satisfactory levels; see “Student
Support Services,” below.
H. Make-Up Exams
Make-up exams are on a case-by-case basis.
I. Course Schedule
PART I. Human Behavior and the Macro Environment
Week 1. Human Behavior and Theoretical Perspectives
Human Behavior and social environment overview
What is human behavior and the social environment?
Why is this course important?
How does the content relate to other social work content?
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Human Behavior Theories-Micro and Macro theories-overview
Ecological Perspective
Systems Theory
Conflict Theory
Social Exchange Theory
Social Behavioral
Humanistic Perspective
A Multidimensional Framework for Assessing Social Functioning
Critical thinking
What is theory?
How do we critique theory?
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapters 1: A
Multidimensional Approach Chapter 2: Theoretical Perspectives on Human Behavior
Assignment:
1. Review Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
Week 2. Culture and Human Behavior
What is Culture?
Understanding Culture and Variation in Human BehaviorAssignment:
Reading: Hutchinson, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 8: Culture
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
The Family
Families as a System
Theoretical Perspectives in Understanding Families
Diversity in FamiliesAssignment:
Reading: Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment; Chapter 10: Families
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
Week 3. Small Group
Group Norms and Processes and Structure
Stages of Group Development
Types of Groups
Composition
Group Theory
Field
Exchange
Self-CategorizationAssignment:
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 11: Small Groups

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1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
. Formal Organizations
Perspectives on Formal Organizations
Developmental Stages of Formal Organizations
Issues of Diversity in Formal OrganizationsAssignment:
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 12: Formal
Organizations
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
Week 4. Communities
Theoretical Approaches to Community
Types of Communities
Social Workers and CommunitiesAssignment:
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 13: Communities
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
Part II. Human Behavior and Human DevelopmentWeek 7. The Biological Person
Biological Theories
The Brain and Behavior
Biophysical Growth and DevelopmentArticles:: Strohman, R. (2003). Genetic determinism as a failing
paradigm in biology and medicine: Implications for health and wellness
. Journal of Social Work Education, 39
(2), 169-189.
Assignment:
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 3: The Biological
Person
1. Review Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
. The Psychological Person
Psychological Theories
Theories of Cognition
Theories of Emotion
Assignment:
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 4; The Psychological
Person: Cognition, Emotion, and Self; Chapter 5: the Psychosocial Person: Relationship, Stress and Coping
1. Review Lecture
2. Take quiz on Moral Development
3. Post Question Response
4. Respond to Classmates
Week 5. The Psychosocial Person
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Psychological Theories
object relations
psychodynamic
social learning
social identity
Theories of Stress and CopingAssignment:
Reading: Hutchison, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 5: The Psychosocial
Person: Relationships, Stress and Coping
1. Review Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
. The Spiritual Person
Transpersonal Theories
Role of Spirituality in Social WorkAssignment:
Reading: Hutchinson, Dimensions of Human Behavior: Person and Environment, Chapter 6: The Spiritual
Person
1. Review Transpersonal Lecture
2. Take Quiz
Week 6. Pregnancy, Birth, Newborn, Infancy
Attachment Theory
Cognitive Developmental Theories
Psychosocial DevelopmentArticles: Eamon, M. K. (2001). The effects of poverty on children’s
socioemotional development: An ecological systems approach.
Social Work 46(3), 256-266.1.Read Culture
Lecture 3. Respond to Classmate
. Early and Middle Childhood
2. Post Question Response
Assignment:
Reading: Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course; Chapter 2: Conception, Pregnancy,
and Childbirth; Chapter 3: Infancy and Toddlerhood
Cognitive and Language Development
Personality, Emotional, & Social Development
Risk & Protective Factors in Healthy Development
The Role of Play and SchoolingAssignment:
Reading: Hutchinson, Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course; Chapter 4: Early
Childhood; Chapter 5: Middle Childhood
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
Week 7. Adolescence
Biological Aspects of Adolescence
Social and Psychological Aspects of Adolescence
Spiritual Aspects of AdolescenceArticles: Weisz, A. & Black, B. (2002). Gender and moral reasoning: African
American youth respond to dating dilemmas.
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 5(1),
35-52.
Assignment:
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Cohler, B. J. & Hammack, P. L. (2007). The psychological world of the gay teenager: Social change, narrative,
and “normality”.
Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 36(1), 47-59.
Reading: Hutchinson, Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course; Chapter 6: Adolescence
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
. Young and Middle Adulthood
Theoretical Approaches to Young and Middle Adulthood
Physical Functioning in Young and Middle Adulthood
Social Relationships in Young and Middle Adulthood
Psychological and Personality Changes in Young and Middle AdulthoodArticles: Johnson, L. & Jenkins, D.
(2004). Coming out in mid-adulthood: Building a new identity:
Journal of gay and lesbian social services:
Issues in practice, policy and research, 16
(2), 19-42.
Reading: Hutchinson, Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course; Chapter 7: Young
Adulthood; Chapter 8: Middle Adulthood
III. Murray, C. (2003) Risk Factors, Protective Factors, Vulnerability, and Resilience: A Framework for
Understanding and Supporting the Adult Transitions of Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities,
Remedial and
Special Education, 24
Assignment:
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
Week 8. Late Adulthood & Very Late Adulthood
Biological Changes During Late Adulthood
Psychological Changes During Late Adulthood
Relationships in Late and Very Late Adulthood
The Dying Process
Grief and LossArticles:
Reading: Hutchinson, Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course; Chapter 9: Late Adulthood;
Chapter 10: Very Late Adulthood
Burr, J. A., Mutchler, J. E., & Caro F. G. (2007). Productive activity clusters among middle-aged and older
adults: Intersecting forms and time commitments.
J. Gerontol. B. Psychol. Sci. Soc. Sci., 62(4): S267 – S275.
Hayslip, Jr., B. & Kaminski, P. L. (2005). Grandparents raising their grandchildren: A Review of the literature
and suggestions for practice
The Gerontologist 45:262-269. Assignment:
1. Read Culture Lecture
2. Post Question Response
3. Respond to Classmates
As the instructor for this course, I reserve the right to adjust this schedule in any way that serves the
educational needs of the students enrolled in this course.
J. Expectations for Out-of-Class Study
Beyond the time required to attend each class meeting, students enrolled in this course should expect to spend
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at least an additional three hours (for each hour of class or lecture per week) of their own time in
course-related activities, including reading required materials, completing assignments, preparing for
assignments and exams, and reviewing online content, etc.
K. Grade Grievances
See BSW Program Manual at:
Or MSW Program Manual at: http://www.uta.edu/ssw/_documents/msw/msw-program-manual.pdf
L. Student Support Services
UT Arlington provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help students develop academic skills,
deal with personal situations, and better understand concepts and information related to their courses.
Resources include
tutoring, major-based learning centers, developmental education, advising and mentoring,
personal counseling, and
federally funded programs. For individualized referrals, students may visit the
reception desk at University College (Ransom Hall), call the Maverick Resource Hotline at 817-272-6107, send
a message to
resources@uta.edu, or view the information at
http://www.uta.edu/universitycollege/resources/index.php.
The IDEAS Center
(2nd Floor of Central Library) offers free tutoring to all students with a focus on transfer
students, sophomores, veterans and others undergoing a transition to UT Arlington. To schedule an
appointment with a peer tutor or mentor email
IDEAS@uta.edu or call (817) 272-6593.
The UT Arlington School of Social Work community is committed to and cares about all of our students. If you
or someone you know feels overwhelmed, hopeless, depressed, and/or is thinking about dying by suicide or
harming oneself or someone else, supportive services are available. For immediate, 24-hour help call MAVS
Talk at 817-272-TALK (817-272-8255). For campus resources, contact Counseling and Psychological Services
(817-272-3671 or visit
http://www.uta.edu/caps/index.php) or UT Arlington Psychiatric Services (817-272-2771
or visit
https://www.uta.edu/caps/services/psychiatric.php) for more information or to schedule an appointment.
You can be seen by a counselor on a walk-in basis every day, Monday through Friday, from 8:00 AM to 5:00
PM in Ransom Hall, Suite 303. Getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do – for yourself and for those
who care about you.​​​
M. Librarian to Contact
The Social Sciences/Social Work Resource Librarian is Brooke Troutman. Her office is in the campus Central
Library. She may also be contacted via E-mail:
brooke.troutman@uta.edu or by phone: (817)272-5352 below
are some commonly used resources needed by students in online or technology supported courses:
http://www.uta.edu/library/services/distance.php
The following is a list, with links, of commonly used library resources:
Library Home Page………………….
http://www.uta.edu/library
Subject Guides………………………. http://libguides.uta.edu
Subject Librarians…………………… http://www.uta.edu/library/help/subject-librarians.php
Course Reserves…………………….. http://pulse.uta.edu/vwebv/enterCourseReserve.do
Library Tutorials ……………………. http://www.uta.edu/library/help/tutorials.php
Connecting from Off- Campus……. http://libguides.uta.edu/offcampus
Ask a Librarian………………………. http://ask.uta.edu
N. Drop Policy

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Students may drop or swap (adding and dropping a class concurrently) classes through self-service in MyMav
from the beginning of the registration period through the late registration period. After the late registration
period, students must see their academic advisor to drop a class or withdraw. Undeclared students must see
an advisor in the University Advising Center. Drops can continue through a point two-thirds of the way
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through the term or session. It is the student’s responsibility to officially withdraw if they do not plan to attend
after registering.
Students will not be automatically dropped for non-attendance. Repayment of certain
types of financial aid administered through the University may be required as the result of dropping classes or
withdrawing. For more information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (
http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/fao/).
O. Disability Accommodations
UT Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of all federal equal opportunity
legislation, including
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), The Americans with Disabilities Amendments
Act (ADAAA),
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. All instructors at UT Arlington are required by law to
provide “reasonable accommodations” to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of
disability. Students are responsible for providing the instructor with official notification in the form of
a letter
certified
by the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD). Only those students who have officially
documented a need for an accommodation will have their request honored. Students experiencing a range of
conditions (Physical, Learning, Chronic Health, Mental Health, and Sensory) that may cause diminished
academic performance or other barriers to learning may seek services and/or accommodations by contacting:
The Office for Students with Disabilities, (OSD) www.uta.edu/disability or calling 817-272-3364.
Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining disability-based academic accommodations
can be found at
www.uta.edu/disability.
Counseling and Psychological Services, (CAPS) www.uta.edu/caps/ or calling 817-272-3671 is also
available to all students to help increase their understanding of personal issues, address mental and behavioral
health problems and make positive changes in their lives.
P. Non-Discrimination Policy
The University of Texas at Arlington does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion,
age, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, genetic information, and/or veteran status in its educational
programs or activities it operates. For more information, visit
uta.edu/eos.
Q. Title IX Policy
The University of Texas at Arlington (“University”) is committed to maintaining a learning and working
environment that is free from discrimination based on sex in accordance with Title IX of the Higher Education
Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs or
activities; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which prohibits sex discrimination in employment;
and the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (SaVE Act). Sexual misconduct is a form of sex discrimination
and will not be tolerated.
For information regarding Title IX, visit www.uta.edu/titleIX or contact Ms. Jean
Hood, Vice President and Title IX Coordinator at (817) 272-7091 or
jmhood@uta.edu.
R. Academic Integrity
Students enrolled all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:
I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that
values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.
I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group
collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the
highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.
UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code in their courses by having students acknowledge
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the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work
submitted. Per UT System
Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for
academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will
be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion
from the University. Additional information is available at
.
S. Electronic Communication
UT Arlington has adopted MavMail as its official means to communicate with students about important
deadlines and events, as well as to transact university-related business regarding financial aid, tuition, grades,
graduation, etc. All students are assigned a MavMail account and are responsible for checking the inbox
regularly. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, which remains active even after
graduation. Information about activating and using MavMail is available at
http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/email/mavmail.php.
T. Campus Carry
Effective August 1, 2016, the Campus Carry law (Senate Bill 11) allows those licensed individuals to carry a
concealed handgun in buildings on public university campuses, except in locations the University establishes
as prohibited. Under the new law, openly carrying handguns is not allowed on college campuses. For more
information, visit

U. Student Feedback Survey
At the end of each term, students enrolled in face-to-face and online classes categorized as “lecture,”
“seminar,” or “laboratory” are directed to complete an online Student Feedback Survey (SFS). Instructions on
how to access the SFS for this course will be sent directly to each student through MavMail approximately 10
days before the end of the term. Each student’s feedback via the SFS database is aggregated with that of other
students enrolled in the course. Students’ anonymity will be protected to the extent that the law allows. UT
Arlington’s effort to solicit, gather, tabulate, and publish student feedback is required by state law and
aggregate results are posted online. Data from SFS is also used for faculty and program evaluations. For more
information, visit
http://www.uta.edu/sfs.
V. Final Review Week
For semester-long courses, a period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long
sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient
time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as
required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or
exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week
unless specified in the
class syllabus
. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or
more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give
any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. During this week, classes are held as
scheduled. In addition, instructors are not required to limit content to topics that have been previously covered;
they may introduce new concepts as appropriate.
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